Saddle Creek-High Trail

  • Date: November 20-21, 2017
  • Location: Hells Canyon National Recreation Area
  • Start: Freezeout Trailhead
  • Distance: 16 miles
  • Duration: 2 days
  • Type: Out-and-back

The search for a snow-free area to go backpacking in the Pacific Northwest can get a little tough by late November. I had originally wanted to head out to Utah or Arizona for some desert trekking, but the long drive there and back would’ve cut too much into our Thanksgiving vacation time. Searching more locally, the Honeycombs of the Owyhee Canyonlands were a particularly strong contender, but the notorious drive to reach the trailhead (and our lack of car-related emergency skills) eventually convinced us otherwise.

At the last minute (literally a day or two before we left), we decided on Hells Canyon in Eastern Oregon. It had actually been on our list for awhile, but we’d set it aside as a spring season trip. With our lack of options, we decided to give it a shot. In the end, it was a far from perfect trip (as evidenced by the trip’s duration and type, which was originally supposed to be a three to four day loop). However, despite the relatively minor setbacks that ultimately convinced us to turn around, our brief time spent in this rugged and remote section of Oregon only convinced us that we need to come back and fully experience everything it has to offer.

 

Day 1: Freezeout Trailhead to Log Creek (8 miles; 5 hours, breaks included)

After dealing with the stress of last minute trip/route planning and, thereafter, procrastinating on packing, we arrived at Freezeout Trailhead a day later than expected. My little Crosstrek was the only vehicle there that morning. Maybe it was because it was a weekday. Or maybe we were the only people dumb enough to be out there with rain and high winds in the forecast. At least we’d most likely have the place to ourselves!

The rain started as soon as we hit the trail and we got our first taste of what tread conditions were going to be like for almost the entirety of our hike in. The combination of prevalent horse use and heavy rain transformed the trails into a sloppy, shoe-sucking, mucky mess. Mud caked our boots from the get-go. Scraping it off was futile as it just continued to pile up as we hiked. In addition to the muck, sopping piles of horse shit (Cassie’s favorite trail snack unfortunately) covered our path. Thankfully, we had an expansive view of the area as we slogged up the switchbacks to Freezeout Saddle; a welcome distraction from the miserable aspects.

Looking down at all the switchbacks
Mack and Cassie nearing the saddle

According to our guidebook map and the signage at the trailhead, Freezeout Saddle is just over two miles in. However, it took us a whole two hours (with almost no breaks except to check our map) to reach it! I found it difficult to believe that we were actually moving that slow. Regardless, it meant we were losing daylight fast and still had a number of miles to cover in order to reach Saddle Creek camp. At this point, I had serious doubts about making it there or even continuing on. I wanted so badly to make our original 30-ish mile loop happen, but I knew it wasn’t likely. Knowing this fueled my desire to just turn around at the saddle, but Mack remained positive and insisted that we at least stay the night and make the most of our trip. I wasn’t thrilled in the moment, but in retrospect I’m happy he convinced me to push on.

In all honesty, we’ve dealt with worse conditions (I’m looking at you Hoh River Trail!), but for some reason, on this particular trip, I just wasn’t in the mood to deal with even the slightest amount of bullshit. If I’m being more honest, I was still feeling bitter about having to forgo our Utah plans (specifically Zion NP, where I’d seen a few friends sharing recent photos of absolutely impeccable trail and weather conditions) for something closer to home and it was messing with my attitude.

Freezeout Saddle
Looking back at where we came from

The rain had subsided by the time we reached the saddle (and blue skies were even starting to peek out from behind the clouds!), but the wind speed had picked up tremendously. We just couldn’t catch a break! We descended quickly in order to escape the blustery wrath and actually enjoyed semi-decent tread conditions and wind-free hiking for a short while. As we made our way down into the canyon, it felt more like we were journeying deeper and deeper into the heart of a vast mountain range straddling the Oregon-Idaho border. I managed to forget about my worries as I looked around me. Then conditions returned to their previous state just before the junction with the Bench “High” Trail. As if the slop fest wasn’t enough, there were even overgrown sections of tall grass thrown into the mix for an additional challenge.

Starting the descent

At the junction, we decided to turn onto the Bench “High” Trail rather than continue descending to Saddle Creek camp. With sunset less than three hours away, our best bet to avoid trekking in the dark on an unmaintained trail was to aim for Log Creek camp, only two to three miles away now. I knew by doing this we’d probably have to scrap the Snake River portion of our route, but I didn’t care anymore. I still half-wanted to turn around and go back to the car, especially when the wind picked up again and practically knocked us over for long stretches of time due to the exposed terrain. The majestic scenery along the Bench Trail managed to pull me back in though.

To our left, towering above us, was the rim of the canyon on the Oregon side. The Western Rim National Recreation Trail was somewhere up there paralleling our current path. To our right lay the Snake River somewhere far below and the outstretched rolling hills and rocky slopes of the Idaho side. We also happened to be moving in the same direction as a giant herd of elk! Over the course of two hours or so we encountered this large group of 30 to 40 at least four times. Cassie went crazy over them, barking and pulling hard on her leash. They continued ahead when they heard us, moving with grace and ease as a unit over the steep, rocky slopes.

Junction with Bench “High” Trail
We took the path on the left
So many elk!

We reached camp around 2:25 pm. (Side note: For those interested in hiking some of this route and camping here, know that this spot is completely unmarked/unsigned. Bring along a good map and be able to find Log Creek on it. The camping spot is a short ways off the trail on a noticeably impacted site.) It wasn’t raining anymore and we were out of the wind. Maybe our luck was about to change? Nope. Instead of getting to relax and de-stress, we were swarmed by gnats. It was impossible to sit outside and enjoy the nice weather and scenery, even if we moved around. They followed us everywhere! I spent our down time in camp swatting them away from my face and picking them out of Cassie’s hair. The gnat attack made cooking dinner an absolute nightmare of course. We barely managed enough to eat because of it.

The only time the swarm finally subsided was when it started to pour again. We were still finishing dinner when it started up. We scrambled to get our food hung and hauled ass back to the tent. Cassie was so desperate to get in she belly crawled under the rainfly and pawed at the tent. She was covered in mud though so she was forced to hold out a little longer until we could wipe her down. She was not happy about this and literally gave us the cold shoulder for the rest of the night. We attempted to salvage the rest of our evening with cocoa and holiday movies as we listened to the rain patter on the tent.

Looking up at the rim

Campsite near Log Creek (as seen from the trail)

 

Day 2: Log Creek to Freezeout Trailhead (8 miles; 4 hours, breaks included)

We awoke in better spirits the next morning, although I think a good deal of that can be attributed to the fact that we’d already decided to cut our trip short and hike back out. With the decent weather, the gnats were back in full force as we packed up the tent. Despite being extremely hungry (especially after not eating enough the previous day), we skipped the sit-down breakfast and stashed snacks in our pockets so we could get moving instead. I munched on my Poptart as we hiked once we’d put some distance between ourselves and the gnats.

Morning snuggles

We’re totally getting attacked by gnats in this picture

We hiked a lot faster this time around while still taking moments here and there to appreciate our surroundings. The conditions hadn’t improved of course, but by this point we were used to it and had clean socks and shoes to look forward to back at the car. Freezeout Saddle remained in view for much of the Bench Trail part of the hike. Always getting closer, but still feeling faraway. I wasn’t looking forward to the final climb up to it.

Storm a-brewin’ it seems

Still a ways from the saddle (upper right)
Miles and miles of this stuff

As expected, the two mile climb from the junction back up to the saddle was the most difficult part of the day. On top of that, the wind and rain had returned and clouds had descended upon much of the Idaho side (i.e. no more expansive views). The Poptart I’d scarfed down a few miles back had done little to satisfy my aching stomach. We were getting closer now though. I daydreamed about all the food we had stashed in the cooler in the car and it kept me moving.

Starting the climb up from the junction
Last bit of bushwhacking!

Cloudy views from near the top

The weather (with the exception of the wind) seemed to instantly improve once we began to make our way down the opposite side of the saddle. We had views again! Somehow though Mack and I had swapped places in terms of general demeanor. Now he was the one in a cranky mood, anxious to get back and change out of his mud covered pants and boots. (Oddly enough, I managed to stay mostly mud-free with the exception of the bottom and sides of my boots) Fortunately, this final stretch went by quickly and before we knew it we were back at the car by 1:15 pm, throwing on clean, dry clothes, and stuffing our faces with bagels and other snacks.

As we sat there in the car, resting up before the long drive back home, I actually felt a tinge of sadness that we were leaving so early. Despite the crappy weather, awful trail conditions, and swarming gnats, the beauty and solitude we’d experienced over the past two days were what stood out in my mind (even if they didn’t completely outweigh some of the negative aspects). Well, Hells Canyon isn’t going anywhere anytime soon as far as I know. We’ll definitely be back to explore more thoroughly in the near future I imagine.

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Salmon River Trail

  • Date: October 31-November 1, 2017
  • Location: Mount Hood National Forest
  • Start: Salmon River West Trailhead
  • Distance: 10.5 miles
  • Duration: 2 days
  • Type: Out-and-back
  • Map: Adventure Maps: Mount Hood Area
  • References: Oregon Hikers

One of the perks of being a music teacher at the academy I work at is the built in vacation time during typical holiday breaks (generally coinciding with the local school district’s schedule). This includes Thanksgiving and Christmas, but in recent years, it has also included Halloween! This year, with Mack no longer working retail (and thereby having more control over his schedule), we were able to plan a Halloween backpacking adventure with Cassie. It was by no means ambitious or difficult (purposefully intended since our final 50K race took place a few days later), but it was the perfect mid-week getaway and a great inaugural trip for what will hopefully become an annual Halloween tradition.

 

Day 1: Salmon River West Trailhead to Goat Creek, with side trip to Frustration Falls viewpoint (5.5 miles; 3 hours 40 minutes, breaks included)

We took advantage of the short mileage day with a later-than-usual start at noon. There were only a couple of cars parked at the trailhead, so we could look forward to some solitude on this generally popular trail. Little to no fellow visitors also meant Cassie could be off-leash! It was a surprisingly beautiful fall day. Sunlight filtered through the dense canopy with an occasional picturesque sunburst. The changing colors of maple and alder trees contrasted beautifully with the vibrant green of the Douglas fir, hemlock, and cedar trees, as well as the variety of ferns carpeting the forest floor. The trail remains close to the river for the first couple of miles. With practically no one else on the trail, the only sounds that filled the air were of rushing water, the rustling of leaves when a breeze passed through, and a few chatty birds.

After passing the wilderness boundary and the first two backcountry camp areas, we began the gradual climb up to the highlight of the trail: the Salmon River Gorge viewpoint. The river roars through the canyon a few hundred feet below this open, rocky bluff. The hillsides are completely draped in dense forest, so the river itself is actually difficult to see, but you can still hear it if you listen closely. Following the viewpoint, we continued along a narrow, very exposed (but brief) section of trail etched into a steep slope that led us back into the shade of the forest.

Stretch of trail after the viewpoint
Looking back at the viewpoint area

While planning our route, one of the side trip opportunities that came up during my research of the area was Frustration Falls. From the trip reports I’d read, I knew to keep an eye out for a steep side trail about four miles in. It also helped that I came out to run some of the Salmon River Trail with a friend just two days earlier. Although we didn’t follow it down, we did find the aforementioned side trail. I might’ve missed it on our trip if I hadn’t scouted it out a couple of days earlier! Although the side trail is short (about a quarter of a mile down to the view of the falls), it’s quite steep and slick. I imagine it can be treacherous after heavy rain. We stashed our packs about half way down as the incline steepened. Despite the tediousness of it all, the stunning three-tiered Frustration Falls was definitely worth the effort.

Frustration Falls

Back on the main trail, we were just a mile or so away from our campsite. It was a slow mile though. The fall colors were irresistible and I found myself pulling out my camera every couple of minutes. Before we knew it Goat Creek was right below us and we could look across the way and see the nearby campsites. Not a single tent was in sight. Our decision to do a mid-week overnighter was certainly paying off!

Goat Creek

It was already late afternoon and about to become early evening by the time we set up camp. We went about enjoying some hot drinks first. Mack packed in a small Nalgene containing butterscotch schnapps to add to our hot cider. The combination literally tastes like caramel apples and is probably my new favorite hot drink (although it might get bumped once I try hot cocoa with peppermint schnapps this winter). To celebrate Halloween, we also packed in frosted pumpkin shortbread cookies and a giant bag of mixed sour candies (Mack’s preferred treat). Cassie chose to hang out inside the new tent (that’s right! no more busted zippers and patched up holes!) and curl up on my sleeping bag. Not even the smell of our delicious Halloween treats could lure her out.

Hogging my sleeping bag even though her personal dog bed is right behind her

It started to get dark quickly, so we attached and staked down the rainfly, cooked up a batch of instant mashed potatoes (and one more round of spiked cider), finished up our treats, then crawled into our sleeping bags. Our new Big Agnes tent has sewn-in lights, so we tested them out. So much better than using our headlamps or flashlights! Hopefully this tent lasts us awhile because so far we love it! We capped off our Halloween themed trip with a “scary” movie. I say “scary” because I’m not sure Donnie Darko really fits this description, but neither of us was really in the mood for some slasher flick or even a supernatural one while we were alone in the woods. Maybe Hocus Pocus will be a more fun choice next year.

Pumpkin shortbread cookies!
Watching Donnie Darko beneath the tent lights

 

Day 2: Goat Creek to Salmon River West Trailhead (5 miles; 2 hours 20 minutes, breaks included)

It was strange waking up and knowing that we’d be going back to work later that afternoon. However, it was also a good incentive to actually get up and get moving quickly. We were packed up and on the trail by 8 am. The sky was still overcast, which made the fall colors along the trail pop even more. It also made the Salmon River Gorge viewpoint far more clear, richer in color, and photogenic now that the heavy sunlight wasn’t blinding me and washing out the image. I was so happy to pass through this section again and see it all in the (far superior) early morning light with the sun barely starting to creep through the clouds.

Trail leading to the viewpoint

Looking out on the Salmon River Gorge

After the mini-photoshoot at the viewpoint, we pressed on to make sure we would make it back to the car before 11 am. Now that we were going downhill our pace was effortlessly faster though. I even managed to find opportunities to take a few more photos (especially now that everything was less washed out by the sun) without adversely affecting our estimated arrival time. We made it back to the car at 10:20 am and even had time to spare at home before either of us went in to teach that afternoon. Despite being a little reluctant to go back to work for a couple more days, our first ever mid-week overnight adventure was just what I needed to get me through the rest of the work week. Hopefully there will be more opportunities to do something like this. At least we’ll be able to count on it for next Halloween!

Playing in the leaves

Salmon River

 

Cape Horn Loop

  • Date: October 28, 2017
  • Location: Columbia River Gorge
  • Start: Cape Horn Trailhead
  • Distance: 7.7 miles
  • Duration: 3 hours 50 minutes (breaks included)
  • Elevation gain: 1300 feet
  • Type: Loop
  • Map: Green Trails Map 428S: Columbia River Gorge-West
  • References: 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles of Portland by Paul Gerald; Washington Trails Association

Since getting more into trail running this past year, day hiking has become less and less common for us. However, with our last race of the season coming up the following weekend and a busy weekend of work events preventing us from doing anything too long, strenuous, or far from home, we decided to head out to Cape Horn with Cassie to make the most of the surprisingly nice fall weather forecast.

The trailhead was packed and we ended up parking a short ways up the road since the lot was full. With so many closures on the Oregon side due to the damage caused by the wildfire, I imagine Cape Horn is now more popular than ever. Despite seeing numerous groups as we started out, we still managed to find some solitude every now and then. The first part of our hike (we started with the upper section) had us climbing switchbacks through a forest bursting with fall colors. I actually completed this hike the previous year with a few friends (no Mack, but Cassie was with me). We went in late November after Thanksgiving, so the fall brilliance had come and gone. It was nice to come back at the height of it all.

After just over a mile we were rewarded with our first view overlooking the gorge at Pioneer Point. Patches of golden orange dotted the usually green landscape as we looked east toward Hamilton Mountain and Beacon Rock. Even the Oregon side looked stunning. From a distance (and with the sun shining so brightly), the scorched land wasn’t as evident. The trail dropped down soon after and met up with an old wagon road so heavily blanketed in fallen leaves that I could hardly see my boots as we walked through.

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View from Pioneer Point

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Idyllic fall setting

After crossing Strunk Road, we continued onto a gravel lane surrounded by green fields and a few houses. A short, pleasant countryside amble before ducking back into the forest. We reached the Nancy Russell Overlook (named for the founder of Friends of the Columbia Gorge), characterized by a beautiful stone amphitheater and a sprawling view of the gorge. I feel a little silly that I didn’t take a picture to include for this post, but it was incredibly crowded and we didn’t stick around very long. We headed back into the peace and quiet of the forest, basking in the increasingly vibrant fall colors. The trail descends down to Hwy 14 and (to avoid having hikers risk becoming roadkill) crosses it by way of a tunnel beneath the road.

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It looks like she’s playing with the leaves, but she’s actually eating her favorite jerky

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The views became more abundant on this half of the hike now that we were on the lower section and switchbacking down alongside the cliff. We passed several vistas along the way that offered expansive views of the river, as well as lonesome Phoca Rock and the strange basalt column, Cigar Rock. This section did have it’s downsides though. The wind was incredibly strong, making it difficult to take any sort of break at the viewpoints we came across. In addition, now that it was getting into the afternoon, there were a lot more people on the trail, some of whom weren’t so great about practicing basic trail etiquette. My penchant for picture taking often times meant we just let people pass us until we were left alone, garnering us a few more moments of solitude.

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Cigar Rock
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Walking along one of the talus slopes with a view of a waterfall (not sure if it’s Cape Horn Falls)

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I was especially happy to experience solitude when we arrived at the wooden footbridge in front of Cape Horn Falls. With no one around, we were able to take the short side trail up to the falls and have the spot all to ourselves for a few minutes. The falls weren’t anything spectacular (at least when we were there). They were more of a trickle really. Being in an isolated spot away from the increasing foot traffic (with a nice view of the footbridge down below and the river beyond that) was the primary appeal. After crossing the bridge, we began a steeper descent to the end of the trail, where we were spit out onto Cape Horn Road.

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Cape Horn Falls

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Bridge in front of the falls

The final 1.3-mile uphill stretch was all on road (save for a very brief section of trail right before the parking lot). Thankfully, we still had some lovely views along the way combining the steep forested hillsides and basalt cliffs that characterize the gorge with the simplicity of the countryside-esque properties that we passed along the road. All in all it was a morning (and partial afternoon) well spent and a lovely return to our original adventure of choice, day hiking.

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Silver Star Mountain via Grouse Vista

  • Date: October 15, 2017
  • Location: Gifford Pinchot National Forest
  • Start: Grouse Vista Trailhead
  • Distance: 9.2 miles (with side trip to Indian Pits and a navigation error)
  • Duration: 3 hours 15 minutes (breaks not included)
  • Elevation gain: 2040 feet
  • Type: Out-and-back
  • References: 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles of Portland by Paul Gerald; Oregon Hikers

After early season snow forced me and some friends to cancel our much anticipated ladies backpacking weekend, I was kind of at a loss about what to do instead. Mack had already planned an exploratory run with a friend, so adventuring together wasn’t an option. I actually considered trying my first solo backpacking trip with Cassie! Unfortunately, the routes I was considering were all under snow as well, and I wasn’t interested in lugging heavy snow gear around for an overnight trip. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little distraught over all my various plans falling through, especially since the weather forecast called for clear skies and sunshine! In the end, I settled on a familiar route up to Silver Star Mountain, which was still (mostly) free of snow and would offer an incredible view with a cloudless sky.

Cassie and I started from Grouse Vista Trailhead sometime mid-morning. There were a few groups heading up around the same time, but it wasn’t too crowded yet. After running/power-hiking the first mile on a steep and rocky forest road, we were rewarded with a little more solitude (and a more level trail) as we emerged from the forest and onto a meadow covered hillside. I’d previously done this route in the spring when wildflowers and green grass carpeted the area. I remember thinking that spring was definitely the best season to explore here. Returning in the fall changed my perspective immediately. We managed a decent pace along the ridge now that we weren’t climbing steeply. It felt good to stretch my legs after the calf burning first mile. After passing beneath Pyramid Rock and enjoying expansive views to the west and northwest, we reentered the forest and started climbing again. Somehow I’d completely forgotten about all the elevation gain on this route…

Looking back at Pyramid Rock

Thin patches of snow became more frequent as we continued to climb, practically covering the trail once we passed the junction with Indian Pits. Cassie bounded back and forth, excited to be running and rolling around in it. After one final steep (and slick because of the snowy conditions) push, we arrived at the saddle between the dual summits of Silver Star. We took the left spur, which leads to Silver Star’s true summit. For a short while, we had the summit to ourselves and enjoyed views of St. Helens, Rainier, Adams, Hood, Jefferson, Sturgeon Rock, and the incredible Bluff Mountain Trail. I attempted a few (okay, maybe 20+) selfies with Cassie since Mack wasn’t around to help with the picture taking, but she wasn’t having it.

Mount St. Helens and Mount Rainier from the summit
Cassie is clearly thrilled that we’re taking a selfie
Sick of photos already

My original plan for the day was to get in a few extra miles by running an out-and-back on Bluff Mountain Trail, tagging Bluff Mountain and Little Baldy along the way. However, by the time we made it down from the summit, it was already past noon and Cassie was moving a bit slower (and very unmotivated to move any faster). After a solid five to ten minutes of debating with myself, I decided to turn around and tack on the shorter side-trip to Indian Pits. It turned out to be a worthwhile alternate. Not only was it completely free of other hikers, but it had one of the most vibrant displays of fall foliage I’ve ever seen! Our run turned into more of a hike as I stopped to take pictures of the increasingly beautiful landscape and mountain views.

Mount Hood from Indian Pits Trail

Cassie at Indian Pits

When we arrived at the pits, I was disappointed to find all of them filled in with rock. Fortunately, when we turned around to head back, the incredible view of Silver Star alongside the Washington volcanoes more than made up for it. I might even go so far as to say that the views surrounding Indian Pits Trail are possibly superior than those from the summit of Silver Star! If you have the time to make it out here during a jaunt up to Silver Star, I strongly recommend it.

Back on the main trail, we continued our descent until we reached an unmarked junction. Looking at the map, the trail appeared to be an alternate route that approaches Pyramid Rock along its eastern side before meeting back up with the main trail shortly after. I decided to give it a shot, but after a half mile or so in I didn’t feel so certain about it. Part of me knew I was probably on the correct route, but now that we’d nearly reached mid-afternoon, taking the familiar route felt like the safer, smarter decision. Cassie was not happy to be turning around since it meant going back uphill. I had to coax her with treats to get her to follow me again.

Silver Star, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Rainier
Close up of St. Helens and Rainier
Looking back at Indian Pits
St. Helens, Rainier, and Adams

We picked up the pace again as we ran downhill following the failed alternate route. The afternoon sun greeted us as we exited the forest and stepped out onto the open hillside, illuminating all the reds, oranges, and yellows that had been cast in shadows earlier that morning. After passing beneath Pyramid Rock again, we turned onto a side trail leading to that same alternate route that wraps around the rock’s eastern side. My goal was to find a worn path leading to the rock’s base so we could scramble up. Since I’d already backed out of running to Bluff Mountain and Little Baldy, I at least wanted to do this!

Pyramid Rock

After searching for a few minutes with no luck, I turned us around. Then, as we were walking back, I noticed Cassie sniffing out a section on the edge of the trail. I thought she was getting ready to chase a squirrel or something, so I walked up ready to put her leash back on. On the contrary, she had sniffed out the climber’s path! I could see a faint path through the grass and brush. It led right to the base of the rock. We ran up and began the short scramble to the top. Usually Cassie is pretty conservative when it comes to exposed routes, but she seemed to have a lot of fun mountain-goating up this one! Although relatively easy, it was her first scramble, so I stayed close by, ready to spot her or lift her up over obstacles if needed. In the end, she ended up not needing any help at all. We enjoyed the summit as long as we were able to tolerate the hundreds of gnats swarming around at the top (which obviously wasn’t very long). The views from the top weren’t anything special after looking at the volcanoes from Silver Star and Indian Pits. However, the process of getting to the top (and back down) was the real worthwhile aspect of this side trip.

Despite not getting in the miles and additional summits that I’d originally hoped for, I returned to the trailhead feeling invigorated and whole. We didn’t have an epic, type 2 adventure, but we played outside, took time to slow down and savor every beautiful moment, and still managed to fit in something new (Pyramid Rock). Coming down from the crazy summer high (which was pretty much all type 2 adventures) has been more difficult than I thought it would be. Spending the day running up Silver Star and exploring around it was a necessary reminder that getting outside with those I love is all that should matter. I should never refrain from doing something because it doesn’t seem “epic” enough. I’d probably miss out on some wonderful experiences (like this one) if I did.

View from the summit of Pyramid Rock
Looking down on Grouse Vista Trail
Getting ready to scramble back down
Cassie hates me